Archive for the 'architecture' Category



Parking lots

edruschaparkinglots

Ed Ruscha
Thirtyfour Parking Lots in Los Angeles 1967

Ed Ruscha’s Dodger Stadium, 1000 Elysian Park Ave. (detail) from Thirty-Four Parking Lots (1967)

dodgersparkinglot09

dodgersparkinglot09_detail

Dodger Stadium today, Google Maps 2009

Thanks to a comment left by my friend Dan in response to this previous post, I discovered Ed Ruscha’s Thirtyfour Parking Lots in Los Angeles 1967. Ed Ruscha hired a helicopter to fly over L.A. early one Sunday morning in 1967 and shot a whole series of vacant parking lots. Beautiful patterns. Brilliant.

The beauty of Google Maps is that I can fly over all the parking lots, in any city, in any part of the world, and I don’t have to hire a helicopter! Not quite the same I know but … it’s great (if you try to ignore the whole Big Brother thing)!

More images from Ed Ruscha’s set can be seen here.

Birds eye patterns

downtown01

downtown02

While cruising over Downtown (virtually speaking) I got very excited by these patterns. Wow. Lots of inspiration from flying!

Salaryman 6

salaryman6

Salaryman 6 is one of my favourite short films. Brilliantly shot and directed by Jake Knight, this is a story about a Japanese Salaryman who looses track of his life through it’s mundanity and predictability.

Unfortunately I can’t find a decent quality version of it online and you need to see it in high quality for best impact. You can view it here, but make sure you have a magnifying glass at hand!

Eames house

eamesfront

eamespatio

eamesswing

One of my favorite places in L.A. without a doubt is the Eames ‘Case Study House #8’.

The design of the house began in 1945 to fit in with the surrounding meadow and eucalyptus trees, building with only post-war off-the-shelf materials. The Eames moved in in 1949 and lived and worked there for the rest of their lives. The house has been kept pretty much as they left it.

You’re not allowed inside the house, just allowed to peer in as much as you can through the windows … and photos of the interior are forbidden. It was built as half house and half work studio, with a small courtyard in between. It’s very simple in design but incorporates a beautiful movable system inside that enables the interior to be rearranged, allowing for the optimum display of certain objects. Of course it contains plenty of furniture and objects designed by Charles and Ray Eames, which inevitably makes us hungry for a bit of shopping!

I always come away from this house feeling inspired. It is such a peaceful place and the details are so simple yet fantastic. It really makes me want to build my own home. Now.

Discovering Susan Sontag

susansontag2

Stills taken from Susan Sontag & Phillip Johnson

I was just doing some slightly haphazard searching online, inspired by listening to a bit of the DnA (Design & Architecture) program on NPR in the car the other day. Through various links I came across a BBC clip of Susan Sontag reporting on the then new Seagram Building in NY. “The elevator swished up like a gigolo’s hand on a silk stocking….” What an amazing description!


Photos

View photos on Flickr and Instagram

Shop

Coming soon! Please contact directly.
© All Rights Reserved.

Please ask for permission before reproducing images or content. If you hold the copyright for an image or specific content and would like us to remove it then please contact us directly.

Follow spacetothink's Blog on WordPress.com